Vol. 4 No. 1 (2021): International Journal of Aging Research
Research Articles

Development of Estimate Formulas for Waist Circumference Using Body Mass Index and Limb Circumferences in Hospitalized Older Adults

Daisuke Takagi1, Masatoshi Kageyama2,3, Kenta Yamamoto4, Hiroshi Matsumoto,5
1Department of Physical Therapy, Health Science University; 2Long-Term Care Health Facilities Sunrise Ohama; 3Graduate School, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Cooperative Major in Medical Photonics (Doctoral Course);4Department of Rehabilitation, Toyoda Eisei Hospital; 5Department of Orthopedic surgery, Toyoda Eisei Hospital

Keywords

  • Estimate formula; Waist circumference; Body mass index; Limb circumference; Hospitalized older adults

How to Cite

Daisuke Takagi1, Masatoshi Kageyama2,3, Kenta Yamamoto4, Hiroshi Matsumoto,5. (2021). Development of Estimate Formulas for Waist Circumference Using Body Mass Index and Limb Circumferences in Hospitalized Older Adults. International Journal of Aging Research, 4(1), 76. https://doi.org/10.28933/ijoar-2020-12-2505

Abstract

Background: Little research has been conducted on the estimate formulas for waist circumference using body mass index and limb circumferences in hospitalized older adults. Thus, we conducted the present study to develop estimate formulas of waist circumference using body mass index and limb circumferences in hospitalized older adults.

Methods: Forty hospitalized older patients were recruited in this cross-sectional study. We measured waist circumference, body mass index, upper arm circumference, forearm circumference, thigh circumference, and calf circumference. The estimate formulas for waist circumference were developed using simple and multiple regression analysis.

Results: Simple regression analysis indicated that body mass index, upper arm circumference, forearm circumference, thigh circumference, and calf circumference were independent explanators for waist circumference (p < 0.05 for all). In addition, body mass index, upper arm circumference, and forearm circumference but not thigh circumference and calf circumference were extracted as independent explanators for waist circumference in multiple regression analysis (p < 0.05). We were able to develop the estimate formulas using body mass index, upper arm circumference, forearm circumference, thigh circumference, and calf circumference.

Conclusion: The results suggest that the estimate formulas for waist circumference may provide an opportunity to easily evaluate waist circumference, even in hospitalized older adults with kyphosis posture. However, future studies should be conducted to develop the estimate formulas for waist circumference with a lower error value.

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