Open Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology https://escipub.org/index.php/OJGH <p>ISSN:2637-4986<br>DOI:10.28933/OJGH</p> en-US OJGH@ESCIPUB.ORG (Open Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology) OJGH@ESCIPUB.ORG (Open Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology) Sun, 19 Jan 2020 20:36:31 +0000 OJS 3.1.2.4 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Kayexalate or Kalimate crystals: are they the culprits or the bystanders? https://escipub.org/index.php/OJGH/article/view/117 <p>Sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate) or its analog calcium polystyrene sulfonate (Kalimate) has long been used to treat hyperkalemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Although the side effect was rare, there were many case reports in the literature. Its etiology remains unclear. Lillemoe et al., on five uremic patients who developed catastrophic colonic necrosis that was temporally associated with the use of Kayexalate in sorbitol, contributed to death in four of their patients. They further provided experimental evidence implicating sorbitol as the agent responsible for colonic necrosis in a rat model. In contrast to the results of aforementioned animal study, Ayoub et al., published another experimental study in rats, they demonstrated that sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS), not sorbitol, was the main culprit for colonic necrosis. Recently, we encountered three patients who had hyperkalemia and were on Kalimate in water. They underwent colonic and gastric biopsy because of developing gastrointestinal symptoms. Kalimate crystals were found in all biopsy specimen, admixed with inflammatory exudate, or standing along on the mucosa surface, without provoking inflammatory reaction. We reviewed the photographs in the published case reports, they were similar to ours. Therefore, we felt that those crystals were bystanders, not the culprits. We fell that SPS ion-exchange resins, if given in water, appears to be clinically effective and reasonably safe to treat hyperkalemia in patients with CKD.</p> Chen Fang Hsu, Swei H Tsung Copyright (c) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://escipub.org/index.php/OJGH/article/view/117 Wed, 08 Jan 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Knowledge of Nutrition Care for Children on Peritoneal Dialysis at National Hospital of Pediatrics, Vietnam https://escipub.org/index.php/OJGH/article/view/119 <p>Background: Nutrition is critically important for chronic kidney diseases, especially for children on CAPD (continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis). Nutrition not only plays the role of medication but also can control most abnormal metabolism disorders and preserve the residual renal functions. However, most patients’ families just focus on peritoneal dialysis while ignoring nutrition for the patients.</p> <p>Objective: Survey the knowledge of nutrition care for children with CAPD prescription.</p> <p>Method: Cross-sectional study on the nutritional status of 31 children undergoing CAPD. Interview and assess knowledge on kidney diseases with peritoneal dialysis, knowledge on nutrition care and nutrition practice of 31 mothers with children undergoing CAPD via a designed questionnaire.</p> <p>Result: The ratio of malnutrition of children on CAPD was 37.8%. Knowledge on caregiving and hygiene for CAPD was good with 74.4% mothers knowing about complications of peritonitis, 64.4% was aware of peritoneal catheter exit-site infection. However knowledge on nutrition was limited, only 25.8% mothers having knowledge on nutrition for the children. 9.7% mothers could meet the requirement in nutrition practice.</p> <p>Recommendation: It is necessary to enhance nutrition communication and counselling to achieve the expected treatment outcomes.</p> Luu Thi My Thuc1; Nguyen Thi Hang Nga1; Nguyen Thi Hang1; Tran Thi Na1; Nguyen Thi Thuy Hong2 Copyright (c) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://escipub.org/index.php/OJGH/article/view/119 Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Usefulness of Castor Oil and Elobixibat and Lactulose for Bowel Preparation for Colon Capsule Endoscopy in the patients on Dialysis -Including examination of small intestinal lesions- https://escipub.org/index.php/OJGH/article/view/120 <p>Colon capsule endoscopy was approved for reimbursement under the national health insurance system of Japan in 2014.<br>Dialysis patients are potentially susceptible to bleeding because of the fragile intestine, impaired platelet function, or oral administration of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or anticoagulants. However, the capsule excretion rate after recommended bowel preparation reportedly ranges from 70% to 90%, and administration of boosters is also necessary. For dialysis patients, liquid loading is a problem. The patient on dialysis has moisture restrictions. The caster oil-based booster had an emission rate of 97%, but required a total water content of 3L. A study was conducted on dialysis patients using a protocol in which castor oil was supplemented with Elobixibat and Lactulose to determine whether booster volume could be reduced and elimination rates improved.</p> Naoki Hotta Copyright (c) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://escipub.org/index.php/OJGH/article/view/120 Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Usefulness of Castor Oil and Elobixibat and Lactulose and Ascorbic Aid (Movicol) for Bowel Preparation for Colon Capsule Endoscopy:A Case Report https://escipub.org/index.php/OJGH/article/view/121 <p>Colon capsule endoscopy was approved for reimbursement under the national health insurance system of Japan in 2014.<br>However, the capsule excretion rate after recommended bowel preparation reportedly ranges from 70% to 90%, and administration of boosters is also necessary. The caster oil-based booster had an emission rate of 97%, but required a total water content of 3L.<br>Some patients have been tested for the second and third time since the test was started in 2014. There is an opinion that these patients could reduce the booster more, and this time we will use the booster with mobiprep to perform the booster on the day with 350 ml.</p> Naoki Hotta Copyright (c) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://escipub.org/index.php/OJGH/article/view/121 Tue, 21 Jan 2020 00:00:00 +0000